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Violent winter storm kills 62 in western Europe

English.news.cn   2010-03-03 00:24:06 FeedbackPrintRSS

PARIS, March 2 (Xinhua) -- A violent winter storm, dubbed "Xynthia," has lashed western Europe, killing at least 62 as of Tuesday.

Portugal, Spain, France, Germany and Belgium all suffered strong gusts and heavy rain.

Spanish authorities Sunday said two men in a car were killed by a tree toppled by a gust, while an 82-year-old woman was killed by a fallen wall.

Rescue workers search for the missing in a flooded residential neighborhood in La-Faute-sur-Mer, western France, March 2, 2010 after a major storm named Xynthia hit western Europe, killing at least 62 as of March 2. (Xinhua/AFP Photo)

Developing in the Atlantic off the Portuguese island of Madeira, Xynthia crossed France's western coast late Saturday before moving on to Belgium and Germany on Sunday afternoon.

France, the worst-hit country, recorded at least 51 victims and several are missing, mainly in Vandee and Charente-Maritime, the two western coastal provinces, which registered the biggest toll.

Most victims died from drowning or from falling trees and buildings.

Rescue workers search for the missing in a flooded residential neighborhood in La-Faute-sur-Mer, western France, March 2, 2010 after a major storm named Xynthia hit western Europe. (Xinhua/AFP Photo)

More than 500,000 households had electricity cut and power supply was not expected to resume for at least three days, national power company Electricity of France said.

The fierce storm killed one man in southern Belgium and brought down some electricity lines.

According to German official data, four people were killed in Germany after their cars were struck by trees dragged down by gusts. Frankfurt airport had to cancel at least 200 flights due to winds of up to 130 km per hour and the city's central train station was closed temporarily.

A woman in England was reportedly killed in her car by surging floods.

Editor: Mu Xuequan

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