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Protestors in Ferguson turn calmer, faith in U.S. justice eroding

English.news.cn   2014-08-22 14:53:57
• Tensions in Ferguson eased after nearly two weeks of protests triggered by the death of Michael Brown.
• The governor of Missouri ordered the withdrawal Thursday of National Guard troops from Ferguson.
• U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder arrived in St. Louis and promised a "fair and independent" federal inquiry.
 
 
 

FERGUSON, the United States, Aug. 21 (Xinhua) -- Demonstrations against the shooting of a black teen by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, gradually quiet down, but mistrust and disbelief prevailed.

The governor of Missouri ordered the withdrawal on Thursday of National Guard troops from riot-torn Ferguson as tensions eased after nearly two weeks of protests triggered by the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown

At the scene where Brown was shot, local residents and people came to pay tribute while expressing their lack of confidence in U.S. justice system.

Jim Wayne Burkes Jr., 34, is a barber from Hot Springs, Arkansas. He came to Ferguson for one day to protest. "How many times can we put our faith in the justice system, and it don't work for us?" he said.

Burkes said he has been a victim of policeman's racial discrimination numerous times. Recalling the most recent one, he said, "In Arkansas, I was with two white girls, and we had just left the club, all of us, and they were both as drunk as I was. And the police pulled us over, I ended up going to jail for public intoxication and they drove away."

Yolanda Jackson, 43, a hair stylist, had been watching events unfold on television and decided to come down.

"My reaction was couldn't they have just tamed him instead of shooting many times into a person who was holding his hands up?" Jackson told Xinhua that she wasn't sure whether the policeman would be tried, but hoped that justice would be done.

Reverend Samuel Mosteller, 56, used to be a federal police officer for 23 year. He said some police officers think they are the law. "When a police officer says he is the law, you get this kind of result. No amount of training is going to ameliorate that problem because it's internal." he said.

Even during his time as a federal police officer, Rev. Mosteller had a run-in with a police officer who he says pulled him over for driving. "I was a federal police officer for 23 years, still got pulled over, some people, one guy in Illinois, didn't believe me, even though I had a badge, all of that, they still wanted to take me in," he said.

"It happens every day, and if you're black you know what it means. You can have your whole life ruined by one police officer that says I'm the law," he said.

St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Missouri, has seen nearly two weeks of riots triggered by the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Brown on Aug. 9 by a white police officer.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder arrived in St. Louis city Monday morning and met with Michael Brown's family privately for 20 minutes, who reportedly asked about the investigative process. Holder promised a "fair and independent" federal inquiry.

Related:

Journalists manage to cover Ferguson unrest amid tear gas

FERGUSON, United States, Aug. 21 (Xinhua) -- Stephanie Lecci knelt over and vomited. She was immersed in a cloud of tear gas. But there was no time for the journalist to stop before another canister landed close to her feet, choked her throat and burnt skin.

The tear gas had blinded the St. Louis Public Radio reporter, but she had to move immediately. Soon the entire street was filled with noxious tear gas. She headed for the press area, but the press area was soon gassed. Nowhere was safe. Full Story

All eerily quiet in Ferguson as U.S. attorney general arrives

FERGUSON, the United States, Aug. 20 (Xinhua) -- Although some 50 protestors remained on West Florissant Avenue amid heavy rain Wednesday night, the situation was eerily calm there as U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder arrived in St. Louis city.

During the night, police on the Avenue, scene of nightly demonstrations that often turn violent, did not wear riot gear and have riot shields or riot dogs. Two armored personnel carriers there did not have their lights on or have police manning the turrets. Full Story

Editor: Yamei Wang
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