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Turkey blames Assad, UN for ISIL threat

English.news.cn   2014-06-21 01:01:24

ISTANBUL, June 20 (Xinhua) -- Turkish foreign minister on Friday blamed the current Syrian government and the UN for the expansion of an al-Qaida splinter group that poses a big threat to the region.

Ahmet Davutoglu made the remarks while attending a joint press conference with his German counterpart Frank-Walter Steinmeier currently on a visit to Istanbul.

"The primary responsible of ISIL (the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant)'s advance in the region posing serious threat to the peace and security is the Assad regime which has been conducting massacres against its own citizen," Davutoglu said.

The top Turkish diplomat also blamed the UN for failing "to protect Syrians," he added.

The ISIL operatives kidnapped 49 Turkish diplomats in the northern Iraq city of Mosul last week. The militants are also detaining 31 Turkish drivers as hostages.

Refuting reports holding Turkey accountable for the development of the ISIL in the region, he said Turkey has suffered from terrorism the most, and is against any kind of terrorist organization including the ISIL.

He also said Turkey didn't asked NATO for a military intervention. The two foreign ministers also excluded the option of foreign military intervention against the Islamist militant group.

"We believe that a government that will be established in Iraq which will include all sides including the Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds would be the only solution," said Steinmeier.

Steinmeier arrived Istanbul on Friday to attend the a bilateral strategic dialogue to discuss bilateral ties and the growing threat of ISIL with Davutoglu.

Editor: Mu Xuequan
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