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Iran urges recognition of nuclear "rights", directs talks with U.S.

English.news.cn   2012-11-08 23:38:19            

TEHRAN, Nov. 8 (Xinhua) -- Iranian officials on Thursday called for the recognition of the nuclear "rights" of the country and for the directs talks with the United States over the controversial nuclear program of the Islamic republic.

The United States and its western allies have been accusing Iran of secretly developing nuclear weapons under a civilian disguise, a charge that has always been denied by Tehran.

According to local reports on Thursday, Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said that recognition of the nuclear rights of the Islamic republic by the United States will build trust in bilateral relations.

"Respect for rights of the Iranian nation will help reduce Tehran's distrust towards Washington," Mehmanparast was quoted as saying by semi-official Fars news agency.

He underscored the necessity for fundamental and practical changes in Washington's "wrong" approaches towards Iran, and said Tehran will judge the United States by its actions not words, according to Fars. The remarks were made in reaction to the recent U.S. presidential election in which Barack Obama was re-elected.

The outcome of the U.S. election showed that Americans want a president that avoids extremist and unilateral policies, the report quoted the spokesman as saying.

On the possibility of restoration of relations between the two countries and solving Iran's nuclear issue, which is recently urged by some Iranian officials, Iranian Judiciary Chief Ayatollah Sadeq Amoli-Larijani also said the Americans should win Iranians' trust in order to restore the relations, Tehran Times daily reported Thursday.

The resumption of "relations with the United States is not easy, and after all these (sanction) pressure, such relations are not possible overnight," Amoli-Larijani said.

Attempts are recently underway by some Iranian expatriates and politicians to restore relations with Washington in order to alleviate the pressures on the country's economy, which has been hit significantly by the Western sanctions over the country's controversial nuclear program.

On Thursday, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said that Iran's nuclear program has been politicized and the dispute should be resolved through direct talks between Iran and the United States, the official IRNA news agency reported.

Ahmadinejad said that all member states of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and even the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) say explicitly that Iran should resolve the issue through direct talks with the United Sates, according to the report.

In case the U.S. administration amends its approach, the Iranian nuclear issue will be resolved, Iran's president was quoted as saying in a press conference on the sidelines of the 5th Bali Democracy Forum underway in Indonesia on Thursday.

"We believe in friendly relations between nations and governments and Iran welcomes any relations based on justice and mutual respect," he said, adding "It should be investigated that who and why severed (the U.S.) ties with Iran ... years ago."

The United States cut diplomatic relations with Iran in 1980 after a group of Iranian students captured some 60 U.S. diplomats in 1979 and 52 of them were held in captivity for 444 days.

On Wednesday, Secretary of Iran's Human Rights Council, Mohammad-Javad Larijani, said pressures will not be able to push Tehran towards talks with the United States.

Any negotiations with the United States should "serve Iran's interests," he said, expressing "scepticism" about the seriousness of U.S. officials in the talks with Iran.

Editor: Mu Xuequan
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