Home Page | Photos | Video | Forum | Most Popular | Special Reports | Biz China Weekly
Make Us Your Home Page
In-depth

News Analysis: Common interests to outweigh lurking trouble between Egypt, Turkey

English.news.cn   2013-07-19 10:38:32            
 • Recently Cairo and Ankara have been trading "hot statements" after Morsi was ousted.
 • Analysts believe such an issue is "ephemeral" compared with prevailing common interests.
 • Fahmy held future of Egypt-Turkey ties depends largely on the way Egypt responds to Ankara's anger.

 

by Shaimaa Behery

CAIRO, July 18 (Xinhua) -- Turkey's discontent over the ouster of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi bodes trouble between the two regional powers, but analysts here believe such an issue is "ephemeral" compared with prevailing common interests.

Recently Cairo and Ankara have been trading "hot statements" after Morsi was ousted amid mass protests against the "maladministration" during his one-year rule.

Both Turkish President Abdullah Gul and Foreign Minister Ahmed Davutoglu called the ouster a "coup against democracy," which was seen as "clear intervention" by the Egyptian transitional authorities.

"Such statements represent a challenge for the people's will," Egyptian presidency media advisor Ahmed al-Moslmany said Tuesday, asking Turkish officials to prioritize the country's historical relations with Egypt and their common interests.

' DISCONTENT WAS EXPECTED

Yousry al-Azabawy, political expert at the al-Ahram center for political and strategic studies in Cairo, saw the Turkish response as "expected" because Morsi and Turkey had maintained a harmonious relationship due to their common ideology.

"The Turkish support was 'normal' and 'intended' to give the Muslim Brotherhood group in Egypt the impression of the 'international backing'," Azabawy told Xinhua, adding that Ankara "is looking in anxiety" at the scenario in Egypt, fearing its "echo" in Turkey.

"However, the regional support, especially from the Gulf states for the new trend in Egypt will 'crack' the Turkish situation," he added, expecting the Gulf countries to exert "economic pressures" on Turkey.

COMMON INTERESTS PREVAIL

Tarek Senouty, head of the international relations department of al-Ahram evening newspaper, saw that Ankara's support to Morsi was out of "dogmatic" belief rather than a "political" one, which means that even if the Turkish anger at Morsi's ouster will "disturb" the ties, it will be "temporary disturbance".

   1 2   

Editor: Liu
分享
Related News
Home >> In-depth            
Most Popular English Forum  
Top News  >>
Photos  >>
Video  >>
Top News Latest News  
  Special Reports  >>
010020070750000000000000011100851325552081