Xinhuanet

Spotlight: Lessons of Chernobyl, Fukushima should be learned to avoid future nuclear tragedies

Source: Xinhua 2016-04-26 18:12:07
[Editor: huaxia]

CHERNOBYL, April 24, 2016 (Xinhua) -- People take photos of Geiger counters near Chernobyl region, Ukraine, on April 19, 2016. Chernobyl, a place replete with horrific memories in northern Ukraine, close to Belarus, is now open to tourists, almost 30 years to the date after a nuclear power plant there exploded. It was the worst nuclear accident in human history. A large tract of land around the plant was designated a forbidden zone and ordinary people were completely prohibited from entering after the disaster occurred on April 26, 1986. The accident released more than 8 tons of radioactive leaks, directly contaminated an area of over 60,000 square kilometers and exposed some 3.2 million people to dangerous levels of radiation. (Xinhua/Chen Junfeng)

KIEV, April 26 (Xinhua) -- Tuesday marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in today's Ukraine, but many painful lessons have not been learned.

In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan was disabled after explosions, a top-level disaster.

Some Ukrainian nuclear safety experts believe that the Fukushima tragedy was preventable given the Chernobyl experience, but human negligence had left the plant unprepared for the earthquake and tsunami.

Olga Kosharna, an expert at the State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine, said that the management of the Fukushima plant had been warned in advance about the risks of failure of the emergency electricity generators and the subsequent failure of the cooling systems in a seismically active place.

As the power generators were washed away in the tsunami and the emergency batteries were designed to power the plant only for several hours, the cooling systems failed, leading to a meltdown of the reactors.

The blasts that have released radioactive material into the environment could also have been avoided if proper preventable measures had been taken, he said.

"If they had re-ionizers of hydrogen or holes in the roof, there would be no explosion and such severe radiation effects. There has been a human error," Kosharna told Xinhua.

Bureaucracy was one of the main reasons why the disaster on the Fukushima nuclear plant was so devastating.

"Japanese mentality is hierarchical -- all are awaiting instructions from the top chief to start acting and it is time-consuming. Besides, there was no independent nuclear agency, which examines the technical state of the plant and decides whether to stop the functioning of the reactor or suspend its operating license," the expert said.

The fact that the top manager of the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, known as TEPCO, was not a nuclear professional also played a role in the tragedy as it was unable to react in a proper way on the emergency situation.

"The lack of safety culture, and the fact that the TEPCO manager was ... not a nuclear physicist who understands the process, also contributed to the disaster," Kosharna said.

Meanwhile, some Ukrainian ecologists believe that Japan's clean-up efforts were also far from perfect, despite Chernobyl lessons.

"The consequences of the Fukushima accident could have been mitigated given the lessons of Chernobyl. It could have been done by providing the local population with necessary medications and preparing for the accident in a proper way," Oleksiy Pasyuk, an expert on energy policy in the National Ecological Center of Ukraine, told Xinhua.

In his opinion, one of the main mistakes made by Japan in the aftermath of the accident was that they had not stocked enough medical iodine tablets, which can prevent the absorption of radioactive material in the human body.

"No iodine tablets were distributed to residents living in the plant's neighborhood, who may have been exposed to radiation -- it was an essential lesson, which they have to learn from Chernobyl," Pasyuk said.

The implications of the accident on the global environment are also very serious, as some emergency elimination efforts had been inadequate, resulting in the release of tons of highly radioactive water from the plant into the world ocean, he said.

"At the time of the accident, the largest part of the contaminated water was released not to the territory of Japan, but into the ocean," Pasyuk said.

He warned that the danger of similar nuclear disasters is real if the world does not learn the lessons of the two tragedies.

"There is a probability that Chernobyl and Fukushima could repeat. The longer nuclear plants operate, the older they are, the higher the probability is. Many of the world's nuclear units have a 30-year life span. The tendency to artificially extend the lifetime of the reactors raises the risks," Pasyuk said.

Related:

Feature: Exploring Chernobyl's forbidden zone

KIEV, April 22 (Xinhua) -- Chernobyl, a place replete with horrific memories in northern Ukraine, close to Belarus, is now open to tourists, almost 30 years to the date after a nuclear power plant there exploded. It was the worst nuclear accident in human history.

A large tract of land around the plant was designated a forbidden zone and ordinary people were completely prohibited from entering after the disaster occurred on April 26, 1986. The accident released more than 8 tons of radioactive leaks, directly contaminated an area of over 60,000 square kilometers and exposed some 3.2 million people to dangerous levels of radiation. Full story

Spotlight: Ukraine sees no alternative to nuclear power 30 years after Chernobyl

KIEV, April 26 (Xinhua) -- Thirty years have passed since the Chernobyl power plant disaster, one of the world's worst nuclear accidents, which has caused widespread environmental pollution and left the areas around the plant uninhabitable for centuries or even millennia to come.

The anniversary of the catastrophe is another reminder that nuclear energy could become a major threat to the world if it is not handled with care and caution. Yet, many experts argue that currently, nuclear power is much safer than it was three decades ago and its role in Ukraine's energy mix is irreplaceable. Full story

[Editor: huaxia]
 
Spotlight: Lessons of Chernobyl, Fukushima should be learned to avoid future nuclear tragedies
                 Source: Xinhua | 2016-04-26 18:12:07 | Editor: huaxia

CHERNOBYL, April 24, 2016 (Xinhua) -- People take photos of Geiger counters near Chernobyl region, Ukraine, on April 19, 2016. Chernobyl, a place replete with horrific memories in northern Ukraine, close to Belarus, is now open to tourists, almost 30 years to the date after a nuclear power plant there exploded. It was the worst nuclear accident in human history. A large tract of land around the plant was designated a forbidden zone and ordinary people were completely prohibited from entering after the disaster occurred on April 26, 1986. The accident released more than 8 tons of radioactive leaks, directly contaminated an area of over 60,000 square kilometers and exposed some 3.2 million people to dangerous levels of radiation. (Xinhua/Chen Junfeng)

KIEV, April 26 (Xinhua) -- Tuesday marks the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in today's Ukraine, but many painful lessons have not been learned.

In March 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan was disabled after explosions, a top-level disaster.

Some Ukrainian nuclear safety experts believe that the Fukushima tragedy was preventable given the Chernobyl experience, but human negligence had left the plant unprepared for the earthquake and tsunami.

Olga Kosharna, an expert at the State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine, said that the management of the Fukushima plant had been warned in advance about the risks of failure of the emergency electricity generators and the subsequent failure of the cooling systems in a seismically active place.

As the power generators were washed away in the tsunami and the emergency batteries were designed to power the plant only for several hours, the cooling systems failed, leading to a meltdown of the reactors.

The blasts that have released radioactive material into the environment could also have been avoided if proper preventable measures had been taken, he said.

"If they had re-ionizers of hydrogen or holes in the roof, there would be no explosion and such severe radiation effects. There has been a human error," Kosharna told Xinhua.

Bureaucracy was one of the main reasons why the disaster on the Fukushima nuclear plant was so devastating.

"Japanese mentality is hierarchical -- all are awaiting instructions from the top chief to start acting and it is time-consuming. Besides, there was no independent nuclear agency, which examines the technical state of the plant and decides whether to stop the functioning of the reactor or suspend its operating license," the expert said.

The fact that the top manager of the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, known as TEPCO, was not a nuclear professional also played a role in the tragedy as it was unable to react in a proper way on the emergency situation.

"The lack of safety culture, and the fact that the TEPCO manager was ... not a nuclear physicist who understands the process, also contributed to the disaster," Kosharna said.

Meanwhile, some Ukrainian ecologists believe that Japan's clean-up efforts were also far from perfect, despite Chernobyl lessons.

"The consequences of the Fukushima accident could have been mitigated given the lessons of Chernobyl. It could have been done by providing the local population with necessary medications and preparing for the accident in a proper way," Oleksiy Pasyuk, an expert on energy policy in the National Ecological Center of Ukraine, told Xinhua.

In his opinion, one of the main mistakes made by Japan in the aftermath of the accident was that they had not stocked enough medical iodine tablets, which can prevent the absorption of radioactive material in the human body.

"No iodine tablets were distributed to residents living in the plant's neighborhood, who may have been exposed to radiation -- it was an essential lesson, which they have to learn from Chernobyl," Pasyuk said.

The implications of the accident on the global environment are also very serious, as some emergency elimination efforts had been inadequate, resulting in the release of tons of highly radioactive water from the plant into the world ocean, he said.

"At the time of the accident, the largest part of the contaminated water was released not to the territory of Japan, but into the ocean," Pasyuk said.

He warned that the danger of similar nuclear disasters is real if the world does not learn the lessons of the two tragedies.

"There is a probability that Chernobyl and Fukushima could repeat. The longer nuclear plants operate, the older they are, the higher the probability is. Many of the world's nuclear units have a 30-year life span. The tendency to artificially extend the lifetime of the reactors raises the risks," Pasyuk said.

Related:

Feature: Exploring Chernobyl's forbidden zone

KIEV, April 22 (Xinhua) -- Chernobyl, a place replete with horrific memories in northern Ukraine, close to Belarus, is now open to tourists, almost 30 years to the date after a nuclear power plant there exploded. It was the worst nuclear accident in human history.

A large tract of land around the plant was designated a forbidden zone and ordinary people were completely prohibited from entering after the disaster occurred on April 26, 1986. The accident released more than 8 tons of radioactive leaks, directly contaminated an area of over 60,000 square kilometers and exposed some 3.2 million people to dangerous levels of radiation. Full story

Spotlight: Ukraine sees no alternative to nuclear power 30 years after Chernobyl

KIEV, April 26 (Xinhua) -- Thirty years have passed since the Chernobyl power plant disaster, one of the world's worst nuclear accidents, which has caused widespread environmental pollution and left the areas around the plant uninhabitable for centuries or even millennia to come.

The anniversary of the catastrophe is another reminder that nuclear energy could become a major threat to the world if it is not handled with care and caution. Yet, many experts argue that currently, nuclear power is much safer than it was three decades ago and its role in Ukraine's energy mix is irreplaceable. Full story

分享
Spotlight: Ukraine sees no alternative to nuclear power 30 years after Chernobyl
Belarus to start new int'l program on Chernobyl in 2017
Feature: Exploring Chernobyl's forbidden zone
Flowers bloom in Harbin Engineering University in NE China
Flowers bloom in Harbin Engineering University in NE China
Scenery of Samaba terraced fields in SW China
Scenery of Samaba terraced fields in SW China
Performance staged to mark 55th anniv. of Sino-Laos ties
Performance staged to mark 55th anniv. of Sino-Laos ties
China Int'l Fair for Investment and Trade showcased in Sydney
China Int'l Fair for Investment and Trade showcased in Sydney
First anniversary of April 25 earthquake marked in Nepal
First anniversary of April 25 earthquake marked in Nepal
2 people hacked to death in Bangladeshi capital
2 people hacked to death in Bangladeshi capital
Lao newly-elected president visits Vietnam
Lao newly-elected president visits Vietnam
Carnation Revolution's 42nd anniversary marked in Lisbon, Portugal
Carnation Revolution's 42nd anniversary marked in Lisbon, Portugal
Back to Top Close
010020070750000000000000011100001353139451