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Syrian parliamentary election shadowed by war

   2016-04-13 14:54:47

Syria's government is holding parliamentary elections against a backdrop of terror and war. Over the past five years, violent clashes have left many cities reduced to rubble.

ISIL militants still control large swathes of territory in the east. This is Syria's second parliamentary election since fighting erupted back in 2011.

The streets in Syria are hardly recognizable... as posters of smiling candidates promising a better future for the war-wrecked country adorn the streets. But people remain skeptical

Elections are our way of saying terrorism has failed and instead we will try and practice democracy by going to vote we say that the state is up and running with its institutions.

"I certainly hope good would come out of the elections and i will go down to vote as i think all people around me will be doing the same," said Razan, Damascus resident.

"If election bring new blood to the parliament then it would be a good thing to renovate," another resident Nahid said.

"Of course i won't go down to vote as i didn't see any credible candidates just some 11 thousand posters of candidates blasted everywhere without any concrete program or a plan," said Raja'Y, Damascus resident.

Here is a park in central Damascus, where many families now live in after they were forced out of their homes. These costly campaigns by candidates are seen as an insult to the war-torn nation, where half the population have been displaced.

A recent study by Damascus University found out that one out of every five Syrian makes a living through benefiting from the ongoing war.

Out of around 12,000 candidates, 2400 of them are warlords or are working for them. That means in theory that those who oversee the violence are the same ones who will be deciding the future of the country.

Election rallies are underway. And the country's ruling party, Ba'ath party, are mobilizing supporters and urging people to take part in the elections - one where they'll surely be on the winning end of.

"In this election we tried to overcome gaps of previous elections and this was a chance for opposition inside the country to take part but they decided to boycott the elections and i think this means they have little popular weight," said Bashir Sharbaji, candidate, Ruling Ba'ath Party.

The Syrian government sees this election as a chance to say two things: firstly, the country is running smoothly and all constitutional deadlines are met. Secondly, that the government still has popular support.

"Some people have decided not to take part in the polls but i think this election is very important in a way it will be our way to send a strong message that we have an independent national decision and preserve our sovereignty," said Maha Shapiro, Parliamentary candidate.

"And regardless of our difficult circumstances we shouldn't allow to leave the country without institutions."

Two of Syria's fourteen provinces are out of government control, but that won't stop the election. Displaced people will vote for representatives for both Araqqa and Edlib -- no matter which province they're in.

And as night falls over the capital, it seems that even the lights and sounds of the election rally can't overshadow the sounds of war.

Many fear that violence could come into play to stop people from casting their votes. Will the watchful eyes of Syrian security agencies manage to pull the elections off? Or will terror strike again? Only the upcoming days will tell.

 

(Source: CNTV.cn)

Editor: Zhang Dongmiao
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Syrian parliamentary election shadowed by war

2016-04-13 14:54:47
[Editor: Zhang Dongmiao]

Syria's government is holding parliamentary elections against a backdrop of terror and war. Over the past five years, violent clashes have left many cities reduced to rubble.

ISIL militants still control large swathes of territory in the east. This is Syria's second parliamentary election since fighting erupted back in 2011.

The streets in Syria are hardly recognizable... as posters of smiling candidates promising a better future for the war-wrecked country adorn the streets. But people remain skeptical

Elections are our way of saying terrorism has failed and instead we will try and practice democracy by going to vote we say that the state is up and running with its institutions.

"I certainly hope good would come out of the elections and i will go down to vote as i think all people around me will be doing the same," said Razan, Damascus resident.

"If election bring new blood to the parliament then it would be a good thing to renovate," another resident Nahid said.

"Of course i won't go down to vote as i didn't see any credible candidates just some 11 thousand posters of candidates blasted everywhere without any concrete program or a plan," said Raja'Y, Damascus resident.

Here is a park in central Damascus, where many families now live in after they were forced out of their homes. These costly campaigns by candidates are seen as an insult to the war-torn nation, where half the population have been displaced.

A recent study by Damascus University found out that one out of every five Syrian makes a living through benefiting from the ongoing war.

Out of around 12,000 candidates, 2400 of them are warlords or are working for them. That means in theory that those who oversee the violence are the same ones who will be deciding the future of the country.

Election rallies are underway. And the country's ruling party, Ba'ath party, are mobilizing supporters and urging people to take part in the elections - one where they'll surely be on the winning end of.

"In this election we tried to overcome gaps of previous elections and this was a chance for opposition inside the country to take part but they decided to boycott the elections and i think this means they have little popular weight," said Bashir Sharbaji, candidate, Ruling Ba'ath Party.

The Syrian government sees this election as a chance to say two things: firstly, the country is running smoothly and all constitutional deadlines are met. Secondly, that the government still has popular support.

"Some people have decided not to take part in the polls but i think this election is very important in a way it will be our way to send a strong message that we have an independent national decision and preserve our sovereignty," said Maha Shapiro, Parliamentary candidate.

"And regardless of our difficult circumstances we shouldn't allow to leave the country without institutions."

Two of Syria's fourteen provinces are out of government control, but that won't stop the election. Displaced people will vote for representatives for both Araqqa and Edlib -- no matter which province they're in.

And as night falls over the capital, it seems that even the lights and sounds of the election rally can't overshadow the sounds of war.

Many fear that violence could come into play to stop people from casting their votes. Will the watchful eyes of Syrian security agencies manage to pull the elections off? Or will terror strike again? Only the upcoming days will tell.

 

(Source: CNTV.cn)

[Editor: Zhang Dongmiao]
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