U.S. committed to civilian nuclear agreement with India: Obama
www.chinaview.cn 2009-11-25 03:35:21   Print
 
°§Obama: U.S. is "fully committed" to finalize a civilian nuclear agreement reached with India.
°§Under the deal, India agreed to separate its civilian and military nuclear programs.
°§Some issues concerning the agreement remain to be solved before the pact can be implemented.

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (Xinhua) -- The United States will be "fully committed" to finalize a civilian nuclear agreement reached with India in 2005, President Barack Obama said here on Tuesday.

    "I reaffirmed to the prime minister my administration's commitment to fully implement the U.S.-India civil nuclear agreement which increases American exports and creates jobs in both countries," Obama told reporters after talks with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) and Indian Prime Minister Manmoham Singh hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., capital of the U.S., Nov. 24, 2009. (Xinhua/Zhang Yan)
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    The United States and India signed the civilian nuclear agreement when former U.S. president George W. Bush visited New Delhi in March 2006, thus ending the long nuclear isolation imposed on India after it tested an atom bomb in 1974,

    Under the deal, India agreed to separate its civilian and military nuclear programs, allowing international scrutiny for the bulk of its power stations to ensure non-proliferation.

    However, some issues concerning the agreement remain to be solved before the pact can be implemented.

    Some U.S. lawmakers from the ruling Democratic Party opposed the U.S.-India civil nuclear treaty, saying it sent a bad message to nations such as Iran that are feared to be seeking nuclear weapons.

    Since Bush took office in 2001, India and the U.S. have made dramatic steps toward forging a strategic partnership after decades of Cold War animosity.

U.S.-India strategic partnership relations upgraded

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (Xinhua) -- The United States and India, geographically separated by long distance, are embracing politically an unprecedented strategic partnership following talks between U.S. President Barack Obama and visiting Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

    The U.S.-India summit at the White House on Tuesday is the first of its kind since Obama took office in January. Attaching great importance to Singh's "first official state visit" to the United States in his presidency, Obama said the latest American trip by the Indian premier reflects the deep bonds between the peoples of the United States and India. Full story

U.S. to strengthen economic ties with India

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (Xinhua) -- The United States and India announced on Tuesday they were launching a dialogue to strengthen economic relationship, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner planning to visit India early next year.

    The new U.S.-India Economic and Financial Partnership, which will focus on three broad areas including macroeconomic policy, the financial sector, and infrastructure development, will be led by U.S. Secretary of Treasury Geithner and Indian Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee. Full story

Obama to visit India next year

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (Xinhua) -- Visiting Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said here on Tuesday that he is looking forward to meeting U.S. President Barack Obama in India.

    "I have invited President Obama to visit India," Singh told a joint briefing after talks with Obama at the White House. Full story

Obama meets Indian PM at White House

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama on Tuesday welcomed Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh at the White House, with both sides vowing to promote bilateral relations.

    Addressing the welcoming ceremony in the White House East Room, Obama spoke highly of India's efforts to promote democracy in the country, saying the United States and India share the bold experiment of becoming democracies after rule by a colonial power. Full story

Editor: Mu Xuequan
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