Japan's Aso, Hatoyama face off in first Diet debate
www.chinaview.cn 2009-05-27 21:02:45   Print

The combined photo shows Japanese Prime Minister and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party President Taro Aso (L) and the main opposition Democratic Party President Yukio Hatoyama (R) during their first face-to-face debate of this year in the Upper House of the National Diet, or parliamentin, Tokyo, capital of Japan, May 27, 2009. Aso and Hatoyama clashed Wednesday in their first Diet debate, where they tried to highlight their policy differences. (Xinhua/Ren Zhenglai)

The combined photo shows Japanese Prime Minister and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party President Taro Aso (L) and the main opposition Democratic Party President Yukio Hatoyama (R) during their first face-to-face debate of this year in the Upper House of the National Diet, or parliament, in Tokyo, capital of Japan, May 27, 2009. Aso and Hatoyama clashed Wednesday in their first Diet debate, where they tried to highlight their policy differences. (Xinhua/Ren Zhenglai)
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    TOKYO, May 27 (Xinhua) -- Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso and opposition leader Yukio Hatoyama lashed out at each other at their first debate in the Diet Wednesday.

    Yukio Hatoyama, the leader of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), blasted Aso's financial policies, saying the government was spending too much public money on policy-making and projects that include maintaining government facilities.

    "This country's system is all in the hands of bureaucrats...let's clean up all the wasteful spending and stop such an extra budget," Hatoyama said.

    Aso has proposed a record extra budget of nearly 15 trillion yen (158 billion dollars) to fund projects to boost employment and the economy. The budget is likely to be enacted in June.

    The opposition has maintained the budget is lavishing taxpayers money on many unnecessary measures, such as the massive deficit-covering bond issuance.

    Aso, who is also president of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), repeatedly criticized Hatoyama and his party by saying they failed to explain a campaign funding scandal that led to the indictment of a secretary of former DPJ chief Ichiro Ozawa.

    Ozawa resigned over the scandal earlier this month and Hatoyama was elected president of DPJ.

    Earlier in the day, the DPJ agreed to draw up common policies together with its smaller opposition allies -- the Social Democratic Party and the People's New Party -- with an eye toward realizing a change of government, Kyodo News has reported.

    LDP ruled Japan nearly unbrokenly for the past 50 years but recent public opinion polls have shown DPJ enjoyed a lead as the preferred ruling party. An election has to be held by Sept. 10.

The combined photo shows Japanese Prime Minister and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party President Taro Aso (L) and the main opposition Democratic Party President Yukio Hatoyama (R) during their first face-to-face debate of this year in the Upper House of the National Diet, or parliamentin, Tokyo, capital of Japan, May 27, 2009. Aso and Hatoyama clashed Wednesday in their first Diet debate, where they tried to highlight their policy differences. (Xinhua/Ren Zhenglai)

The combined photo shows Japanese Prime Minister and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party President Taro Aso (L) and the main opposition Democratic Party President Yukio Hatoyama (R) during their first face-to-face debate of this year in the Upper House of the National Diet, or parliamentin, Tokyo, capital of Japan, May 27, 2009. Aso and Hatoyama clashed Wednesday in their first Diet debate, where they tried to highlight their policy differences. (Xinhua/Ren Zhenglai)
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Editor: An
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