Obama vows not to deploy ground troops in Pakistan
www.chinaview.cn 2009-03-30 01:00:23   Print

    WASHINGTON, March 29 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama vowed in a Sunday TV interview not to deploy ground troops in Pakistan to pursue al-Qaeda militants.

    Obama told CBS's "Face the Nation" that he has not changed his approach to launch missile strikes at militants.

    "If we have a high-value target within our sights, after consulting with Pakistan, we're going after them," he said.

U.S. President Barack Obama vowed in a Sunday TV interview not to deploy ground troops in Pakistan to pursue al-Qaeda militants.

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks in Washington announcing a comprehensive, new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan March 27, 2009.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
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    Obama ruled out the possibility that U.S. troops could be sent in hot pursuit into militant safe havens inside Pakistan, noting "our plan does not change the recognition of Pakistan as a sovereign government."

    "We need to work with them and through them to deal with al-Qaeda, but we have to hold them much more accountable," he added.

    The interview was taped as the Obama administration announced anew and comprehensive strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan on Friday.

    With a focus to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat" al-Qaeda terrorists, the strategy demands the United States to provide more military, economic and diplomatic help to strengthen Pakistan's anti-terror capabilities.

    The new strategy came as the U.S. government is shifting its focus from the Iraq war to the Afghanistan war, which is considered as the frontline to fight against terrorists.

    On his 18-month troop withdrawal plan, Obama said in the interview that he would not speed it up since the country still needs U.S. help.

    "No, I think the plan that we put forward in Iraq is the right one, which is let's have a very gradual withdrawal schedule through the national elections in Iraq," he said.

    "There's still work to be done on the political side, to resolve differences between the various sectarian groups around issues like oil, around issues like provincial elections," the president added.

    Obama has ordered that all U.S. combat troops be brought back from Iraq by Aug. 31 next year, but 35,000 to 50,000 troops will remain behind until the end of 2011.

    Some Democratic lawmakers and many anti-war activists were opposed to the plan and demanded faster withdrawal.

Obama lays out goals, strategies in Afghanistan, Pakistan 

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks in Washington announcing a comprehensive, new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan March 27, 2009. Standing behind Obama (L-R) are advisor Bruce Riedel, Commander of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen, National Security Advisor James Jones, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates.(Xinhua/Reuters Photo)
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    WASHINGTON, March 27 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama on Friday announced a comprehensive new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, including sending more troops to Afghanistan and providing new funds for Pakistan.  Full story

Pakistani president welcomes new U.S. plan for Afghanistan,Pakistan

    ISLAMABAD, March 27 (Xinhua) -- Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari on Friday welcomed the U.S. initiatives for Pakistan to strengthen democracy and provide an aid package to the country.

    "Pakistan has always held the Pakistan-U.S. relations in high esteem and his announcements during speech on new strategy on Afghanistan and Pakistan will further cement these ties," Zardari said in a statement.  Full story

Editor: Mu Xuequan
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