Chinese court upholds death penalty for police killer
www.chinaview.cn 2008-10-20 10:49:37   Print

    SHANGHAI, Oct. 20 (Xinhua) -- A Shanghai court has upheld the death penalty for Yang Jia, a jobless Beijing man who stormed into a Shanghai police bureau earlier this year and killed six officers.

    After the final hearing of Yang's case, the Shanghai Higher People's Court turned down his appeal against the death sentence handed down earlier by a local court, according to the final verdict the court announced Monday.

Yang Jia(C), 28, stands in the Shanghai Higher People's Court in Shanghai, east China, on Oct. 20, 2008. The court upheld the death penalty for Yang Jia, a jobless Beijing man who stormed into a Shanghai police bureau earlier this year and killed six officers.

Yang Jia(C), 28, stands in the Shanghai Higher People's Court in Shanghai, east China, on Oct. 20, 2008. The court upheld the death penalty for Yang Jia, a jobless Beijing man who stormed into a Shanghai police bureau earlier this year and killed six officers.(Xinhua Photo)
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    The death penalty given by the Shanghai No. 2 Intermediate People's Court at first trial on Sept. 1 was "based on ample facts and evidence" and was meted out in line with Chinese legal procedures, the higher court said.

    The death sentence verdict must be ratified by the Supreme People's Court in Beijing before Yang, 28, can be executed.

    Yang stabbed a security guard at the police branch in Shanghai's Zhabei District and started a fire at its gate on July 1. He then forced his way into the building and attacked nine police officers with a knife, killing six of them. Four others were injured, including the guard.

    He was apprehended at the scene and confessed to the killings.

    Yang reportedly had a grievance against Shanghai police for a lengthy interrogation last October, when he was questioned for riding an unlicensed bicycle.

    He later sued the officers for 10,000 yuan (1,464 U.S. dollars)for damages for psychological injury, but the claim was rejected.

    The court ruled Yang had a perfect capacity for criminal responsibility according to a forensic psychiatric assessment conducted by a qualified and specialized institute commissioned by the police. It gave no specific name for the institution.

    A second trial was held last Monday to hear Yang's appeal, during which his lawyers Zhai Jian and Ji Jianqing tried to defend him by convincing the court he was mentally incapable. But the lawyers' request for a second psychiatric assessment was turned down by the court.

    Both lawyers are based in Shanghai and were appointed by the Shanghai lawyers association to defend Yang.

    Yang Jia's father had hoped to appoint lawyers from Beijing, and even reached an agreement in July with Beijing Xiongzhi Law Firm, which offered to defend Yang for free. Yang allegedly turned down the offer, saying he would only accept lawyers arranged by his mother.

    His mother, however, was reported missing shortly after the July 1 assault and was never found. Yang himself raised no objections to the lawyers appointed for him by the Shanghai lawyers association.

Editor: Du Guodong
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