Judges and lawyers: Rioters in Lhasa unrest receive fair trial
www.chinaview.cn 2008-05-01 22:38:14   Print

Special report: Tibet: Its Past and Present    

An open court session in connection with the Lhasa violence on March 14 is held at the Intermediate People's Court of Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, April 29, 2008.

An open court session in connection with the Lhasa violence on March 14 is held at the Intermediate People's Court of Lhasa, capital of southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region, April 29, 2008. (Xinhua Photo)
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    LHASA, May 1 (Xinhua) -- Thirty people jailed for their involvement in the March 14 riot in Lhasa, Tibet, have received fair trials, lawyers and judges said on Thursday.

    Three were sentenced to life and the others received terms ranging from three to 15 years, according to the Intermediate People's Court of Lhasa, which passed down the sentences at a public court session on Tuesday in the autonomous region.

    They were convicted of arson, robbery, creating disturbance, assembling to assault state organs, preventing state personnel from carrying out their functions and theft. The riot killed 18 civilians and one police officer and injured hundreds of others. The total property damage was more than 280 million yuan (40 million U.S. dollars).

    The trials from April 21 to 25 for the 30 suspects strictly followed the Criminal Law of the People's Republic of China and the Criminal Procedure Law of the People's Republic of China, saidCao Qing'an, Lhasa Intermediate People's Court vice president, in an interview with Xinhua.

    Cases for 29 defendants were heard in public, while the other involved a minor who could not be identified.

    "We fully supported the defence lawyers to consult the materials of the criminal facts and meet the defendants in custody," said Cao.

    In the following proceedings, the defendants could hire their own lawyers. The court would also designate lawyers for those who could not afford to be defended.

    "The defendant Yexe told me that the police did not extort or torture him for a confession. His jail term was shorter than I expected," said lawyer Sun Wenge.

    Yexe, 23, assaulted stores and restaurants and stoned police at the gate of the Public Security Bureau of Linzhou County on March 15. He also incited others to set fire to a vehicle, the court heard.

    He was convicted of creating disturbance and assembling to assault state organs.

    "He would have faced a jail term of up to 15 years, but as he surrendered himself, the court adopted my opinions and shortened the term (to 12 years)," Sun said.

    The chief justice and the court clerks were all native Tibetans, while only six of the 28 judges were Han Chinese, said Gaisang Doje, deputy head of the criminal tribunal of the court.

    The proceedings were conducted in Tibetan. The court also provided translations among the defendants and the Chinese judges and lawyers.

    All the fees for translation and lawyers during the proceedings were paid by the regional center for legal aid.

    According to the law, the 30 accused can appeal to the Higher People's Court of the Tibet Autonomous Region within 10 days.

    17 jailed for Lhasa violence

    LHASA, April 29 (Xinhua) -- Seventeen people were sentenced on Tuesday to jail terms ranging from three years to life in connection with the Lhasa violence on March 14, a Lhasa court said.

    The Intermediate People's Court of Lhasa, capital of Tibet Autonomous Region, passed down the sentences at an open court session on Tuesday morning. Full Story


Exhibition on Tibet's past, present held in Beijing

Jia Qinglin, Li Changchun and Zhou Yongkang, members of the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee Political Bureau, visited a large-scale theme exhibition, "Tibet, the Past and the Present," on Wednesday.

Jia Qinglin, member of the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee Political Bureau, visits a large-scale theme exhibition, "Tibet, the Past and the Present," on Wednesday. (Xinhua Photo)
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    BEIJING, April 30 (Xinhua) -- Jia Qinglin, Li Changchun and Zhou Yongkang, members of the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee Political Bureau, visited a large-scale theme exhibition, "Tibet, the Past and the Present," on Wednesday.

    During their separate visits, they were shown around the 160 material exhibits and more than 400 pictures. The exhibition is being held in two halls of the Nationalities Cultural Palace. Full story

Commentary: Dalai Lama is spewing lies

    BEIJING, April 30 -- The 14th Dalai Lama is adept at issuing appeals to his disciples, and several days ago in New York City, while meeting press, he distributed another appeal to all Chinese religious believers in the world. Dalai has urged Chinese government to stop "suppressing" local Tibetans, and release all criminal suspects who were arrested for the "March 14" violent and terrorist act in Lhasa.

    Dalai is spewing lies, rumors and hearsays again in this statement. Full story

Expert: Tibetan "government-in-exile" still a theocratic power

    BEIJING, April 28 (Xinhua) -- The Tibetan "government-in-exile" in fact is still a theocratic power, an integration of church and "state" with the Dalai Lama at the top, according to a senior Tibetologist.

    Under its claim of power division, the Tibetan "government-in-exile" sets up its legislative framework (the Assembly of Tibetan People's Deputies), executive body (the Kashag), and judiciary (the Tibetan Supreme Justice Commission), but the Dalai Lama is still at the top with a firm grip on religious and executive power, said Bi Hua, senior researcher with China Tibetology Research Center.  Full story

Editor: Mu Xuequan
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