California to track emissions from international ships
www.chinaview.cn 2007-12-08 16:07:01   Print

    LOS ANGELES, Dec. 20 (Xinhua) -- City and state officials of California reached an agreement on Friday to track emissions from international ships, rail lines and trucks used for business at the Port of Los Angeles.

    The inventory of greenhouse gas emissions will include information on all ships bound for the port and all rail lines and trucks used to transport goods to and from port terminals, according to the agreement.

    The information will be reported to the California Climate Action Registry (CCAR) on an annual basis.

    "This path-breaking agreement calls for several important steps that will identify and reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with maritime operations at the Port of Los Angeles," said California Attorney General Jerry Brown.

    "Today's agreement demonstrates the commitment of the city and port of Los Angeles to take specific and concrete steps to fight global warming."

    The data will help port officials bring the facility into compliance with AB 32, a state bill that requires the California Air Resources Board to find ways to reduce the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020.

    The legislation also requires California Air Resources Borad (CARB) to track emissions from industries it determines to be significant sources of gases that contribute to global warming.

    Under the agreement, port officials will also build a 10 megawatt photovoltaic solar system to offset 17,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide a year.

    Last year, the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners and the Port of Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners approved the 2-billion-dollar Clean Air Action Plan to cut air pollution at the port complexes.

Editor: Yao Siyan
Related Stories
WWF calls on developed countries to take lead in emission reductions
Indonesia dismisses concern on high emission, promises to fix peat-land
China turns to clean biomass solution for emission cuts
Home World
  Back to Top