U.S. troops probably stay in Iraq for "protracted period"
www.chinaview.cn 2007-09-17 05:19:44   Print

Special report: Tension escalates in Iraq

¡¤Gates said U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period".
¡¤Gates said U.S. troops in Iraq would take a transition in their role.
¡¤Gates said Friday it would possible to further cut troop levels from 130,000 to 100,000.

U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period" despite gradual withdrawal, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Sunday.

U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, seen here in August 2007, says Sunday U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period" despite gradual withdrawal.(Xinhua Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>

    Washington, Sept. 16 (Xinhua) -- U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period" despite gradual withdrawal, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Sunday.

    "Assuming the conditions prevail in Iraq that allow us to continue the draw down that the president has talked about, the idea is that we would have a much more limited role in Iraq for some protracted period of time, a stabilizing force," he told ABC News, "a force that would be a fraction of the size of what we have there now."

    However, he did not elaborate on the number of the "fraction," only saying it has to be decided on after consultation with Iraqis to "see what they're prepared to accept."

    Gates said, as recommended by Gen. David Petraeus, U.S. troops in Iraq would take a transition in their role from combating to enhancing border security, fighting terrorists and training Iraqi forces.

    When asked by the TV host if U.S. presence in Iraq will last 50 years like in South Korea, Gates said "history remains to be written."

    "If we leave Iraq in a situation where it's stable and where they are making good progress, then probably not," he said, "But if we leave an Iraq where there is chaos or instability, where al-Qaida has the chance to come back, then you could have substantial forces for some protracted period of time."

U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period" despite gradual withdrawal, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Sunday.

Tens of thousands of protesters stage the first anti-war protest in the U.S. capital of Washington since January on Saturday, demanding an end to the Iraq war.(Xinhua Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>


    After Bush announced a gradual reduction of about 30,000 troops from Iraq by next July, Gates said on a Friday's news conference that it would possible to further cut troop levels from about 130,000 to 100,000 by the end of next year if Iraq situation continues to improve.

    However, the Bush administration's withdrawal plan is still short of satisfying Democrats and most public. Demanding much larger size of reduction, Democratic lawmakers are preparing to submit another defense bill next week to push in Congress for a more significant withdrawal of troops from Iraq.

    Thousands of people rallied near the White House on Saturday and lashed out Bush's latest speech and the government assessment report on Iraqi situation that both praised "progress" in Iraq brought by U.S. troop surge and defended the current Iraq policy. They marched to the Capitol Hill later in the day as a move to call for more lawmakers to support the bill on withdrawal.

U.S. troops would probably stay in Iraq for a "protracted period" despite gradual withdrawal, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Sunday.

Protesters stage the first anti-war protest in the U.S. capital of Washington since January on Saturday, demanding an end to the Iraq war. (Xinhua Photo)
Photo Gallery>>>

 

CIA analyst says West losing in Iraq, Afghanistan

    OTTAWA, Sept. 16 (Xinhua) -- The West is losing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan because it does not understand the true motives of terrorists and is thus taking wrong strategies against them, a former analyst of U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) said Sunday.

    The reason for Osama bin Laden and his followers to fight the West is not because of their different values, or because they hate freedom, democracy or gender equality, but rather lies in Western countries' policies in the Middle East, Michael Scheuer, a retired 22-year CIA veteran told Canadian Television during an interview.  Full story

Greenspan: Iraq war was really for oil

    LONDON, Sept. 16 (Xinhua) -- Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, in a memoir to be released Monday, says the prime motive for the March 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq was oil, The Sunday Times reported.

    In his long-awaited memoir, Greenspan will also deliver a stinging critique of U.S. President George W. Bush's economic policies, according to the paper.  Full story

Editor: Mu Xuequan
Related Stories
6 killed in motorcycle bombing in N Iraq
U.S. soldier killed in bomb attack in Iraq
Protest in Washington demands end to Iraq war
Insurgent leader killed in raid in S Iraq
UK troops in Iraq to be halved by December
Home World
  Back to Top