Vigil held in U.S. for those lost in Iraq war
www.chinaview.cn 2007-01-03 12:48:43

Thomas Gallagher holds up a placard to mourn for the fallen U.S. soldiers in Iraq during a vigil at Union Square in New York, the United States, January 2, 2007. Protestors held vigil for those lost in the Iraq war on Tuesday, calling for a stop of Iraq war. The death of a Texas soldier, announced Sunday by the Pentagon, raised the number of U.S. military deaths in Iraq to at least 3,000 since the war was launched in March 2003.

Thomas Gallagher holds up a placard to mourn for the fallen U.S. soldiers in Iraq during a vigil at Union Square in New York, the United States, January 2, 2007. Protestors held vigil for those lost in the Iraq war on Tuesday, calling for a stop of Iraq war. The death of a Texas soldier, announced Sunday by the Pentagon, raised the number of U.S. military deaths in Iraq to at least 3,000 since the war was launched in March 2003. (Xinhua Photo/Hou Jun)
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    NEW YORK, Jan. 2 (Xinhua) -- About 200 U.S. protestors held vigil around the country on Tuesday for those lost in the Iraq war-- both military and civilian, according to United for Peace and Justice (UFPJ), an anti-war nongovernmental organization that called the demonstration.

    In New York City, the events were held in four separate venues in Manhattan and one in Brooklyn.

    From 6:30 p.m. local time (2330 GMT), dozens of people began holding candles in the chilly evening in Union Square, Manhattan, carrying signs reading "No to troop surge. Bring them home safe, now." "How many deaths you want? Over 3,000. Why? Out of Iraq!" "No justice, no peace."

Protestors held vigil for those lost in the Iraq war on Tuesday, calling for a stop of Iraq war, Jan. 2, 2007.

Protestors held vigil for those lost in the Iraq war on Tuesday, calling for a stop of Iraq war, Jan. 2, 2007. (Xinhua Photo/Hou Jun)
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    "Terrorist is in the White House," said a female passerby. "What we are doing feels like terrorism."

    Daniel Kaiseon, a college professor who took part in the vigil, said the current U.S. foreign policy was ridiculous.

    "3,000 soldiers died, 25,000 others were injured so seriously. That's why the Republicans lost the Congress," Daniel told Xinhua.

    Leslie Kielson, a UFPJ activist said: "The majority sentiment in this country is that the war needs to end. Sending more troops is not a solution. It will not achieve the goal."

    Just feet away, two counter-protesters with a group called United American Committee erected a U.S. flag and their own signs, with messages reading "Warning: Leftist protesters trying to demoralize our troops."

    They were shortly surrounded by outraged rebutters who mourned the human cost of the war and complained about the country's deficit.

    In the square, an old man held a picture featuring a fallen Iraqi boy and wrote a line of words above the picture: "Your tax dollars at work!"

    According to local reports, President George W. Bush is expected to deliver his Iraq policy speech soon in the face of mounting opposition to the Iraq war.

    The death of a Texas soldier, announced Sunday by the Pentagon, raised the number of U.S. military deaths in Iraq to at least 3,000 since the war was launched in March 2003.

    Local media said that Bush may announce his new strategy before his annual State of the Union speech on Jan. 23 and potentially include an increase of 15,000 to 30,000 combat troops to be deployed in Iraq.

    The UFPJ has handed out hundreds of leaflets, calling on people to join a massive march in Washington on Jan. 27 to send a strong message to the Congress and the Bush administration: Bring the troops home now. 

Editor: Nie Peng
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