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Microsoft admits problems with latest Windows patch
www.chinaview.cn 2006-04-18 16:13:26

    BEIJING, April 18 (Xinhuanet) -- Microsoft Corp. has admitted a major conflict between a recently distributed critical Windows security patch and Hewlett-Packard software shipped with numerous HP products, PC World reported on Monday.

    First released on April 11, the KB908531 security patch fixes a critical security hole in Windows Explorer that could give a remote attacker complete control of a user's computer. But almost immediately after the release, users began posting reports on various Microsoft forums of serious issues - like Office-application and IE lock-ups.

    Microsoft acknowledged the glitches in an official TechNet posting that describes a conflict between the patch and HP's Share-to-Web software.

    For the most part the glitches result from problems with some Hewlett-Packard software products, including any HP DeskJet printer that includes a card reader, HP scanners, some HP CD-DVD players/burners, and HP cameras, Microsoft said.

    The problem is primarily affecting consumer users and is having "little to no impact on corporate networks," Microsoft Security Program Manager Mike Reavey wrote in a posting to the Microsoft Security Response center blog over the weekend.

    Microsoft will issue an update to correct this problem, but for now the company advises users to make certain changes in the Windows registry, which acts as sort of the table of contents for the Windows operating system. Enditem

    (Agencies)

Editor: Nie Peng
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