www.xinhuanet.com
XINHUA online
CHINA VIEW
VIEW CHINA
 Breaking News Aso named Japan's foreign minister     Japan's Cabinet resigns to pave way for reshuffle    Koizumi reshuffles ruling party leadership    Okinawa governor rejects US force repositioning plan    Militants to bomb 5 capitals in South Asia: reports    Koizumi names Abe as chief cabinet secretary    
Home  
China  
World  
Business  
Technology  
Opinion  
Culture/Edu  
Sports  
Entertainment  
Life/Health  
Travel  
Weather  
RSS  
  About China
  Map
  History
  Constitution
  CPC & Other Parties
  State Organs
  Local Leadership
  White Papers
  Statistics
  Major Projects
  English Websites
  BizChina
- Conferences & Exhibitions
- Investment
- Bidding
- Enterprises
- Policy update
- Technological & Economic Development Zones
Online marketplace of Manufacturers & Wholesalers
   News Photos Voice People BizChina Feature About us   
Greenhouse effect occurred 5,000 years ago: archaeologists
www.chinaview.cn 2005-10-31 19:10:24

    JINAN, Oct. 31 (Xinhuanet) -- It is common sense nowadays that excessive carbon dioxide in the air caused by excessive lumbering leads to global greenhouse effects.

    But a team of archaeologists from China and the United States is saying that the greenhouse effect started about 5,000 years ago, much earlier than people might expect.

    This is the conclusion reached by a group of Chinese and US archaeologists based on research on the relics excavated from the ruins of a Neolithic site in Rizhao City, east China's Shandong Province, over the past ten years.

    The joint archaeological team of experts from Shandong University and US scholars began its survey at the ruins of the ancient Liangcheng Town in suburban Rizhao in 1995, focusing on the relationship between plants and human activity.

    They collected wood samples from the site and did research on 21 pieces of waterish logged timber and three pieces of charcoal. Archaeologists found that the wood excavated at the site were mostly the remains of burning or construction activities.

    "Prehistoric human beings probably burned wood in cooking, lighting, molding pottery and even bronze smelting, while large quantities of relics of ancient housing facilities indicate that people of that time lumbered much to build houses," said Kuan Fengshi, head of the Archaeological Research Center of the Shandong University and a member of the excavation group.

    The team also deduced that prehistoric human beings used plantsfor other purposes, such as curing diseases, making furniture or tools and feeding animals, but these plants were hardly preserved and found.

    Luan concluded that the remains of plants and trees at the siteshowed that prehistoric humans had started lumbering and that the increase of carbon dioxide therefore probably started before the industrial age.

    The traditional view was that human beings affected the environment little in ancient times and that it was not human beings but climate change or catastrophes that promoted or vanquished ancient cultures.

    "What we have found has refuted the conception," said Luan. Enditem

  Related Story
Copyright ©2003 Xinhua News Agency. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.