www.xinhuanet.com
XINHUA online
CHINA VIEW
VIEW CHINA
 Breaking News 20 prisoners killed in prison break in Cambodia     EU's position of lifting arms ban on China remains unchanged     China supports Brazilian candidate to run for the WTO chief    US backed Iraqi forces kill 80 insurgents west of Tikrit    Kyrgyz leader sacks interior minister, prosecutor     Hu Jintao meets DPRK premier     
Home  
China  
World  
Business  
Technology  
Opinion  
Culture/Edu  
Sports  
Entertainment  
Life/Health  
Travel  
Weather  
  About China
  Map
  History
  Constitution
  CPC & Other Parties
  State Organs
  Local Leadership
  White Papers
  Statistics
  Major Projects
  English Websites
  BizChina
- Conferences & Exhibitions
- Investment
- Bidding
- Enterprises
- Policy update
- Technological & Economic Development Zones
Source Manufacturers and Suppliers from China and around the world
   News Photos Voice People BizChina Feature About us   
US starts bird flu vaccine test in humans
www.chinaview.cn 2005-03-24 13:10:25

    WASHINGTON, March 23 (Xinhuanet) -- The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) said Wednesday it has started human tests of a vaccine against H5N1 bird flu in efforts to prepare to respond to a possible bird flu pandemic.

The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) said Wednesday it has started human tests of a vaccine against H5N1 bird flu in efforts to prepare to respond to a possible bird flu pandemic.

A researcher works inside a lab for a human bird flu vaccine. (AFP/file)
    
The tests on the vaccine safety in the first phase will involve 450 healthy adults in Baltimore, Los Angeles and Rochester, New York. If shown safe, the vaccine is planned to be further tested in other populations such as old people and children.

    The vaccine is made by Sanofi Pasteur from an inactivated H5N1 bird flu virus isolated in 2004. Chiron Corp. of Emeryville, California, also has a US government contract to make an H5N1 bird flu vaccine.

    "While there have been relatively few cases worldwide of H5N1 avian influenza infection in humans, the public health community is concerned that the virus will develop the capability of efficiently spreading from human to human and thus create a risk for a worldwide pandemic," NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci said in a statement.

    In the bird flu breakout since the end of 2003 in Asia, "between January 2004 and March 11, 2005, there were 69 confirmed cases of and 46 deaths from H5N1 infection in humans reported to the World Health Organization," said the NIAID.

    Usually, people get infected with the virus in the direct contact with birds such as chickens or ducks.

    "To date, there has been a small number of cases where human-to-human transmission of the virus may have occurred. However, public health experts fear that the virus may evolve into one that is more easily transmitted between people," the NIAID said. In that case, "a worldwide pandemic could follow." Enditem

  Related Story
Copyright ©2003 Xinhua News Agency. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.