www.xinhuanet.com
XINHUA online
CHINA VIEW
VIEW CHINA
 Breaking News US to press Syria to withdraw troops from Lebanon    URGENT: Bomb kills 5 in southern Thailand    UNITED IRAQI ALLIANCE WINS 140 SEATS IN NATIONAL ASSEMBLY -- ELECTORAL COMMISSION    LARGE EXPLOSION HEARD NEAR CITY OF DAILAM IN IRAN: IRAN STATE TV    IRAN BLAST THOUGHT TO BE FIRED FROM UNKNOWN AIRCRAFT: IRAN STATE TV    Pakistan, India to restart Kashmir bus link     
Home  
China  
World  
Business  
Technology  
Opinion  
Culture/Edu  
Sports  
Entertainment  
Life/Health  
Travel  
Weather  
  About China
  Map
  History
  Constitution
  CPC & Other Parties
  State Organs
  Local Leadership
  White Papers
  Statistics
  Major Projects
  English Websites
  BizChina
- Conferences & Exhibitions
- Investment
- Bidding
- Enterprises
- Policy update
- Technological & Economic Development Zones
Source Manufacturers and Suppliers from China and around the world
   News Photos Voice People BizChina Feature About us   
Antidepressants may raise suicide risk
www.chinaview.cn 2005-02-18 15:59:03

    BEIJING, Feb. 18 (Xinhuanet) -- Links between popular antidepressants and suicide are unveiled today, showing that taking popular drugs such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft are more than twice as likely to attempt suicide as patients given sugar pills.    
Links between popular antidepressants and suicide are unveiled today, showing that taking popular drugs such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft are more than twice as likely to attempt suicide as patients given sugar pills.
Modern antidepressant drugs like Prozac and Seroxat may make patients twice as likely to try to kill themselves than if they were not taking any pills at all.

    The British Medical Journal published three studies on SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).

    Researchers led by Dean Fergusson from the Ottawa Health Research Institute in Canada reviewed 702 studies published since 1967 on SSRIs, a class of drugs that includes Eli Lilly & Co.'s Prozac, Solvay SA's Luvox, GlaxoSmithKline Plc's Paxil, Pfizer Inc.'s Zoloft and Forest Laboratories Inc.'s Celexa and Lexapro.

    It found a twofold increase in the risk of a suicide attempt on the drugs. 

    The second study in the BMJ was carried out by the department of epidemiology of Bristol University. It looked at data from 477 published and unpublished trials submitted to the drugs regulator, 

    It found no evidence that SSRIs increased the risk of suicide or suicidal thoughts but found some evidence of higher risk for self-harm. 

    The third study compared people put on SSRIs by their GP for the first time with those given the older antidepressants, called tricyclics. It found no difference in the number of suicides and episodes of self-harm, which the authors say is "reassuring".

    The results "should make doctors aware that SSRIs and tricyclics may induce or worsen suicidal behavior during the early phases of treatment," said Andrea Cipriani, a psychiatrist at the University of Verona in Italy and John Geddes, a psychiatrist at Oxford University in a comment. "They should also discourage the routine prescribing of antidepressant drugs in children and adolescents." Enditem

    (Agencies)

  Related Story
Selected winner works of World Press Photo Contest 2005
Pakistan, India agree on cross-Kashmir bus
Leung as new candidate for "Zhang Daqian"
- Individual travel to HK, Macao expanded
- Chinese teenage girl murdered in Malaysia
- Ex-astronaut to be NASA acting chief
- Researchers may have found life on Mars
- China condemns CIA's warning on its military efforts
- UK eases visa application process in China
- World population reaches 6.5 bln in 2005: UN report
- Few people feel guilty about piracy: survey
- Bush pledges to solve Iran issue diplomatically
- Israeli army stops home demolitions
- US security coordinator visits Mideast
- Arafat's nephew to be named Palestinian FM: sources
- Bush to depart for European trip
- Ghaddafi pays unannounced visit to Egypt
- Uganda dismisses BBC report on child-soldiers
- US expresses concerns over Russia's missile sale to Syria
Copyright ©2003 Xinhua News Agency. All rights reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.